false
Sunday 06/01
Virginia
9
Baseball
2
Sunday 06/01
Bucknell
0
Baseball
10
Saturday 05/31
Virginia
3
Baseball
0
Friday 05/30
Liberty
2
Baseball
3
Saturday 05/24
LSU
11
Baseball
1
Friday 05/23
Ole Miss
7
Baseball
8
Thursday 05/22
LSU
7
Baseball
2
Wednesday 05/21
Ole Miss
1
Baseball
2
Tuesday 05/20
Texas A&M
0
Baseball
4
Saturday 05/17
Missouri
5
Baseball
7
Friday 05/16
Missouri
0
Baseball
4
Thursday 05/15
Missouri
4
Baseball
9
Sunday 05/11
Texas A&M
6
Baseball
5
Saturday 05/10
Texas A&M
3
Baseball
7
Friday 05/09
Texas A&M
2
Baseball
3
Sunday 05/04
Ole Miss
1
Baseball
11
Saturday 05/03
Ole Miss
7
Baseball
4
Friday 05/02
Ole Miss
3
Baseball
2
Tuesday 04/29
Missouri State
1
Baseball
4
Saturday 04/26
Auburn (DH Game 2)
7
Baseball
2
   
Print  
Position:
Todd Butler bio
Courtesy: Chad Crunk, Athletic Media Relations
Todd Butler joined the Razorback staff in July of 2005 and is known around the country for his ability to attract the best talent and develop strong hitters. The Razorbacks use those talents to their fullest as Butler serves as the hitting instructor, outfield coach and recruiting coordinator. Butler is in his eighth year on the Razorback coaching staff and is in his 16th year as an assistant coach in the Southeastern Conference. Butler was promoted to Arkansas’ associate head coach following the 2012 season.
   
In his seven seasons at Arkansas, Butler has helped the Razorbacks to two College World Series appearances, seven NCAA regional berths, three NCAA super regional appearances and two SEC Western Division titles. In addition, Butler has constructed five top-10 recruiting classes and had 46 players taken in the MLB Draft.
   
For the second time in his tenure at Arkansas, Butler helped Arkansas to the College World Series in 2012. Timely hitting and strong defense helped the Razorbacks win their first two games in Omaha and ultimately finish in a tie for third. The Razorback offense finished near the top of the SEC in several offensive categories during league play. Against the rugged SEC schedule, Arkansas was second in on base percentage (.355), second in runs scored (158), second in RBI (141), tied for second in doubles (55) and third in walks (113). Arkansas finished the 2012 season with 46 victories, the most wins in a season since 1990 and the sixth-highest single-season total in school history. Arkansas won at least 40 games in a season for the 18th time in program history and for the fourth-consecutive year The Razorbacks finished the season ranked in the top six in all four of the major college baseball polls, including a final No. 3 national ranking in the USA Today/ESPN Coaches poll, the NCBWA poll and the Collegiate Baseball poll.
   
Butler coached junior third baseman Matt Reynolds to first-team All-SEC honors, third-team All-America accolades and second-team All-Region honors. Reynolds finished the 2012 season with a .323 batting average, seven homers, 45 RBI and 16 stolen bases. Senior infielder Bo Bigham and sophomore infielder Dominic Ficociello also garnered All-SEC honors in 2012. Bigham earned second-team recognition for his work at second base after hitting .306 in conference games, while Ficociello was named to the league’s all-defensive team for the second straight year after committing just one error in league games for a .997 fielding percentage. Freshman infielder/outfielder Brian Anderson was selected to SEBaseball.com’s All-SEC freshman team after he hit .346 with two homers and nine RBI in league play.
   
Five offensive players from Arkansas’ 2012 team were selected in the 2012 MLB Draft. Reynolds was a second round choice of the New York Mets, Tim Carver was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in the 19th round and Sam Bates was taken in the 29th round by the Cleveland Indians. Derrick Bleeker and Jacob Morris were each drafted in the 37th round with Bleeker going to the Baltimore Orioles and Morris to the Cleveland Indians.
   
In 2011, Butler helped guide the Razorbacks to an SEC Western Division title, a 10th straight appearance in the NCAA Tournament and the 17th 40-win season in program history, including the third consecutive season of at least 40 wins. With power numbers down throughout college baseball, the Razorbacks found another way to produce runs, the stolen base. The Razorbacks led the SEC with 122 stolen bases, which were the sixth most in school history, and were only caught stealing 27 times, an 82 percent success rate.
   
Ficociello was a consensus freshman All-American after leading the Razorbacks with a .335 batting average and 50 RBI. Juniors James McCann and Jarrod McKinney also produced career-best numbers at the plate. McCann hit .306 with six homers and 38 RBI, while McKinney hit .301 with two homers and 20 RBI. Both were selected in the 2011 MLB Draft with McCann going in the second round to the Detroit Tigers, while McKinney was taken in the 31st round by the Houston Astros. Collin Kuhn, who hit .282 with seven homers and 41 RBI, and Kyle Robinson, who hit .286 with a team-high 10 homers and 49 RBI, were both drafted by the Chicago White Sox in the 2011 draft. Kuhn was a 17th round selection, while Robinson was taken in the 28th round.
   
The 2010 Arkansas offense was one of the most prolific in school history. The Razorbacks finished the season with a .306 team batting average, the first time since the 2005 season that the Razorbacks had closed a year with a better than .300 team batting average. Arkansas also set a school record with 92 home runs hit during the 2010 season. This high-powered offense helped the team to a 43-21 record and a trip to the NCAA Super Regionals for the second-straight year, marking the first consecutive trips to a Super Regional in program history.
   
A pair of Butler’s pupils were honored with All-America honors following the 2010 season. Zack Cox set a new school record with a .429 batting average to go along with nine home runs and 48 RBI, while Brett Eibner hit .333 with a team-leading 22 homers and 71 RBI. Both players were early-round selections in the 2010 MLB Draft. Cox was the sixth first-round pick in school history after being taken by the St. Louis Cardinals with the 25th overall pick. Eibner was selected in the second round with the 54th overall pick by the Kansas City Royals. In addition, Andy Wilkins, who finished his career with a .307 batting average, 42 home runs and 165 RBI, was drafted by the Chicago White Sox in the fifth round of the 2010 draft.
   
In 2009, the Razorbacks used a combination of power and team speed to advance to the College World Series for the sixth time in program history. The hot-swinging Razorbacks blasted their way through the Norman Regional, on their way to producing 38 runs in the three-game round. Arkansas went on to add 16 runs to its postseason total in a sweep of Florida State in the Tallahassee Super Regional. The hitting barrage carried over into the Razorbacks’ first game in Omaha with 10 runs against Cal State Fullerton.
   
In 2007, Arkansas hit .288 and finished second in the SEC with 75 home runs on its way to capturing the SEC Western Division title and advancing to the championship game of the SEC Tournament.
   
Butler has constructed 10 recruiting classes that ranked among the nation’s top 10 including five in his seven years with the Razorbacks. The 2010 recruiting class was ranked eighth by Baseball America, while his 2008 recruiting class was ranked fourth by Collegiate Baseball. Both the 2005 and 2006 classes were ranked 10th by Baseball America.  In 2005, the publication tabbed Arkansas’ recruiting class as the nation’s top junior college collection of players and some of those players have already made their mark in professional baseball as right-handed pitchers Jess Todd and Duke Welker were both drafted in the second round of the 2007 MLB Draft. Todd ascended quickly through the St. Louis Cardinals’ organization and was called up to the big leagues in June 2009.
   
On the field, Butler has also made a huge impact with the Razorbacks as his teams have produced five of the top 10 home run hitting clubs in program history. In Butler’s first season the Razorbacks belted 65 home runs which ranked sixth all-time. Since then, the 2007 team blasted 75 home runs in 64 games, the 2008 team hit 77 in 58 contests, the 2009 team hit 80 in 65 games, while the 2010 team belted 92 homers in 64 games, an average of 1.44 homers per game.
   
While his influence on the Razorbacks as a whole has been profound, it’s the work he has accomplished with several individuals that paints a much brighter picture. Danny Hamblin was a terror at the plate during the 2006 and 2007 seasons as he produced some of the biggest single-season home run totals ever. Hamblin connected for 17 home runs as a junior after hitting just 17 his first two seasons at Arkansas. Despite getting drafted by the Oakland A’s, Hamblin returned to Arkansas for his senior season and slammed another 22 home runs, the second-highest single-season total in school history. His 57 career home runs are the most by any individual in Razorback history.
   
Another Butler disciple was Logan Forsythe who went from a .189 hitter as a freshman to .347 as a sophomore and .351 as a junior. Forsythe flourished with Butler’s guidance and earned first-team All-SEC honors after his junior season and was drafted in the first round of the MLB Draft by the San Diego Padres thanks to his skills at the plate and defensive prowess. Forsythe made his Major League debut in 2011 and has played in 153 games with the Padres over the last two seasons.
   
During Butler’s 20-year career as a NCAA Division I assistant or head coach, he has helped his teams to five College World Series appearances, 16 NCAA regionals, four NCAA super regionals, six conference tournament championships and his teams have been ranked No. 1 four times in his career. In addition, Butler has coached 31 All-Americans, 124 players drafted in the MLB Draft and 20 Major League players.
   
One of the most experienced and talented assistant coaches in college baseball, Butler came to Fayetteville after two assistant coaching stints (eight total years) at the University of Alabama and three years as the head coach at his alma mater, McNeese State.
   
In 2001, Butler took over as head coach at McNeese State in his hometown of Lake Charles, La., where he compiled a 90-83 (.520) overall record in three seasons. In his last season at McNeese, he guided the Cowboys to the 2003 Southland Conference Tournament championship, their first in 10 years.

The win at the conference tournament secured just the fourth NCAA Regional bid in McNeese State’s history and the Cowboys were sent to the Houston Regional at Rice’s Reckling Park. Butler’s team gave eventual national champion Rice all they could handle before falling to the Owls, 3-2, in 10 innings. Ole Miss eliminated the Cowboys from the 64-team field the following day.
   
Prior to assuming the head coaching duties at McNeese State, Butler served as the hitting instructor and outfielders coach during his first stint with the Crimson Tide from 1995-2000. He helped guide Alabama to six NCAA Regional appearances as well as three trips to the College World Series in 1996, 1997 and 1999. The Tide advanced to the SEC Tournament in all six of those seasons, claiming the SEC Tournament title in 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1999.
   
Butler also earned his reputation as one of the country’s top recruiters during those first six years at Alabama. He helped the Crimson Tide land some of the nation’s top talent as Alabama recorded three-consecutive top 10 recruiting classes. The Tide’s 1999 freshman class was ranked as the fourth-best in the country and still ranks as the highest ranked class in school history.
   
Under Butler’s leadership, the Crimson Tide became one of the most feared offensive clubs in America. Alabama’s 1997 team led the NCAA in four offensive categories, including runs scored (679), total hits (860) and total bases (1,571) while finishing second in home runs (160). In addition, the Crimson Tide won the NCAA statistical championship for highest slugging percentage (.621), eclipsing the previous school record (.521 in 1983) by 100 points. The 1997 team also set a NCAA record with 13 home runs in a single game.
   
Butler returned to Alabama as an assistant baseball coach on June 26, 2003. He spent the 2004 and 2005 seasons on the Tide staff as the recruiting coordinator, hitting instructor and infield coach, while also coaching first base.
   
He continued to showcase his ability to sign some of the top recruiting classes in the country upon his return to the Alabama bench. Alabama’s 2005 freshman class was rated 10th in the fall of 2004 in Baseball America’s Dandy Dozen College recruiting classes.
   
Before joining Alabama for the first time, Butler served as an assistant coach at McNeese State in 1993 and 1994. He was an assistant coach at Blinn Junior College in Brenham, Texas, in 1992, where he helped the Buccaneers advance to the NJCAA World Series.
   
Butler’s coaching career began as a student-assistant coach at McNeese State, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in liberal studies in 1991.
   
Butler spent two summers coaching in the Alaska Baseball League. His first stint in Alaska was as an assistant coaching job in 1991 with the Kenai Peninsula Oilers, helping them to the NBC World Series. He then coached for the Anchorage Glacier Pilots in 1992.  
   
Butler played his college ball at McNeese State and Oklahoma. A team captain for the Sooners in 1988, Butler still holds the OU single-season record for stolen bases with 46 steals in 1988, including 26 consecutive successful stolen base attempts. Butler was a third-team All-American and earned All-Big Eight Conference honors in 1988. Butler also played for the Wareham Gatemen in the Cape Cod League.
   
Butler was born on July 23, 1966, in Alexandria, La., and is married to the former Melissa Borrel. The couple has two daughters, Caitlyn (15) and Kendyll (10).

advertisement
Uploaded Ad
Lowes Social Ad