false
Wednesday 04/16
LSU
4
Tennis - Men
1
Saturday 04/12
LSU
1
Tennis - Men
4
Sunday 04/06
University of Tennessee
4
Tennis - Men
0
Friday 04/04
University of Georgia
4
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0
Sunday 03/30
University of South Carolina
4
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0
Friday 03/28
University of Florida
3
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4
Sunday 03/23
Mississippi State
4
Tennis - Men
2
Friday 03/21
Ole Miss
4
Tennis - Men
2
Friday 03/14
University of Nebraska-Omaha
0
Tennis - Men
5
Friday 03/14
University of Nebraska-Omaha
0
Tennis - Men
5
Friday 03/14
Texas A&M University
4
Tennis - Men
0
Sunday 03/09
University of Alabama
3
Tennis - Men
4
Friday 03/07
Auburn University
4
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3
Sunday 03/02
University of Kentucky
6
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1
Friday 02/28
Vanderbilt University
7
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0
Sunday 02/23
SIU-Edwardsville
0
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4
Sunday 02/23
SIU-Edwardsville
1
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6
Saturday 02/22
Oklahoma State University
5
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2
Friday 02/14
University of Tulsa
4
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3
Sunday 02/09
Purdue University
6
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1
   
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Story of a Lifetime

02/12/2012
Kevin Trainor, Athletic Public Relations
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Black History Month began Feb. 1, 2012, and will be celebrated through the end of the month, ending Feb. 29, 2012. The University of Arkansas Athletics Department begins its fourth year of recognizing the accomplishments of current and former Razorback student-athletes as well as other prominent students, faculty and staff with its web series on ArkansasRazorbacks.com. This year, the web series will feature stories of former Razorback student-athletes who have gone on to coaching positions in universities or colleges around the state and country. In addition, the series will recognize four Silas Hunt honorees.

Few people can match the experience former Arkansas Razorbacks' men's basketball coach Nolan Richardson had on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012. Surrounded by his former players, coaches and nearly 7,000 fans, Richardson saw the story of his life play out on the screens of Bud Walton Arena.

40 Minutes of Hell, the third installment of the SEC Storied series, was shown for the first time following Arkansas' basketball game against South Carolina on the scoreboard video boards. The 48 minute film featured the life of Richardson, including the ups and downs of a lifetime that has included everything from facing segregation to vaulting to the top of the college basketball world.

It was a story that was too good to pass up. "We came to 40 Minutes of Hell and the Nolan Richardson Era pretty quick," John Dahl, Executive Producer of ESPN Films, said. "We thought it was really a rich story, a great story to tell. It was about a time when Arkansas was really at the forefront in American culture, politics and sports and that wasn't even just on paper. Coach (Nolan Richardson) and President (Bill) Clinton had an actual relationship. I just thought it was a wonderful story to tell. It's is just a really important story for everyone to see."

Richardson was born in El Paso, Texas. He played basketball at Texas Western College (now the University of Texas at El Paso) and was coached for two years by future Basketball Hall of Famer Don Haskins.

Coach Richardson began his coaching career at Bowie High School in El Paso, Texas. He then moved to Western Texas College, where he won the National Junior College championship in 1980. He was the head coach at Tulsa from 1981 to 1985, leading Tulsa to the NIT championship in 1981. In 1985, Richardson became the head coach at the University of Arkansas, where he gained national recognition.

Richardson took the University of Arkansas to the Final Four three times, losing to Duke in the semifinals in 1990, winning the National Championship in 1994 against Duke, and losing in the Championship game to UCLA in 1995. He was named the National Coach of the Year in 1994. His teams typically played an up tempo game with intense pressure defense - a style that he termed "40 Minutes of Hell." He won more games as than any other basketball coach in Arkansas history, compiling a 389-169 record in 17 seasons before being dismissed in 2002. 

Coach Richardson is the only head coach to win a Junior College National Championship, the NIT and the NCAA Tournament. Richardson was elected to the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame in 2008, the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame in 1998 and the University of Arkansas Sports Hall of Honor in 1996.

Coach Richardson was raised in El Paso's "Segundo Barrio" or "Second Ward," and speaks Spanish fluently. From 2005 to 2007, he served as the head coach of the Panamanian National Team. In March 2007, Richardson was named as the head coach of the Mexican National Team. In 2009, Coach Richardson assumed the head coaching position for the WNBA Tulsa Shock and stepped down this past summer.

Richardson is being honored as one of four recipients of the Silas Hunt Legacy Award, which recognizes African Americans for their significant achievements or contributions to the community, the state and the nation.

The Silas Hunt Legacy Award was created by the university in 2005 and first awarded in 2006. This year's recipients were nominated and selected by a volunteer selection committee of University of Arkansas faculty, students, professional staff and former recipients.

On Feb. 2, 1948, Silas Hunt became the first black student in modern times to attend a major Southern public university when he was admitted without litigation into the University of Arkansas School of Law. Hunt, who grew up in Texarkana, was a veteran of World War II and earned his undergraduate degree at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, now the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. Hunt died of tuberculosis in the spring of 1949 before finishing his law degree.

Richardson and the other three Silas Hunt Legacy Award honorees, Dr. Roderick McDavis, C.C. Mercer, and Marjorie Wilkins Williams will be honored at a formal black-tie event in April.

But for now, people all over the nation are learning more about the man behind the phenomenal college coaching career. Thanks to the film, Richardson's story will be told for months and years to come and that is something that the Hall of Fame Coach is certainly proud of.

"I am very appreciative to the fact that these guys (the producers of the film) who made me and my family and a lot of my players and fans very, very proud to do this," Richardson said. "That being said, I have always said that everything you see sometimes doesn't sit well with some people. The truth of the matter is that you were able to investigate and come up with a lot of things that I'd even forgotten. I am very honored, very proud and very satisfied with what I saw (the film)."

It is a story of a lifetime and one that will undoubtedly inspire others to overcome their own obstacles to find success. After all, Nolan Richardson blazed his own trail and opened the doors for others in the process.  


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