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Q&A with a Razorback: Dorian Ulrey

BY ANDRES FOCIL
Q&A with a Razorback:  Dorian Ulrey

Dorian Ulrey is a junior on the Razorback men’s cross country team and a senior on the Razorback men’s track and field team. He made his 2009 cross country debut at the 21st annual Chile Pepper Festival on Oct. 17 and led the Razorbacks to a third-place finish in the team race, while picking up a fourth-place finish individually. His 10K time of 29:37.50 currently leads the SEC.

Ulrey was a member of Team USA at the 2009 IAAF World Championships in Berlin in August. During the 2009 track season, he earned four All-America honors, won three SEC individual titles, set a school record as the anchor of the distance medley relay and clocked some of the NCAA’s fastest times in the 1,500 meters, mile, 3,000 meters and as a member of the distance medley relay.MR: What is one thing about your sport that a lot of people don’t know? DU: When people think about the sport of running most times it is thought of as just one sport, but really running can be split into many sports, such as cross country (which is run in the fall), indoor track and field (winter), and outdoor track and field (spring). So if you are a distance runner like myself you are competing year round, possibly with less than two weeks off for an entire year. MR: What would you be doing if you weren’t running/going to school at Arkansas? DU: If running was not in the picture I would be spending a lot more hours in the classroom. Instead of only taking 12 hours on top of running, I would be taking more hours each semester to graduate sooner. If I were not at the U of A, I would probably be closer to home, possibly going to school at the University of Illinois, Chicago.MR: What are your plans post-graduation and running? DU: Post graduation will be a time when many things will be happening. I will be looking for a house,a new car,and hopefully running professionally for a sponsor like adidas or Nike. If running is something that I choose to keep recreational rather than professional, I will be looking for employment either back home in Chicago or possibly in Colorado Springs. MR: If you could have dinner with any three people, who would it be? DU: My dream dinner would consist of my grandfather, Riley, who died whenI was very young. I would lovethe chance to have a real conversation with him. Second would be the man for whom I am named after, Steven Jukes [His full name is Dorian Steven Ulrey]. He must have been a very special man for my father to suggest naming me after.And last, but not least, would be Steve Prefontaine, one of the greatest American distance runners of all time, who struggled with gaining equal rights for runners, which has helped my running today. MR: Which runner do you try to emulate your style after? Why? DU: After seeing (Arkansas’) Alistair Cragg race a few times in college, and seeing his desire to not only win but break records every time he stepped on the track, I really gained a new perspective into racing and what it means to be a Razorback.Alistair’s ability to be respected by teammates and feared by his opponents is something that I inspire to achieve through my running.MR: You’ve had a lot of success at Arkansas – four All-America honors, a school record, three SEC titles, member of two SEC Championship teams. What’s your favorite memory so far? DU: To be completely honest, my favorite memory is everything that was mentioned. To have my first year as a Razorback be so successful was truly a great year, and not just because of the achievements but because of the friendships made and the team atmosphere. To be a Razorback is unlike anything else, and my first year of being a Hog is something I will never forget. MR: You transferred to Arkansas when Coach Bucknam got the head coach position. What is one of the most important things you have learned from him? DU: Coach Buck has instilled many things in me that would not have been possible without him. He has been like a father since leaving home for college.The most important thing that he has taught me in terms of running is to never settle. To settle allows laziness to creep in, and laziness is the slippery slope downward that can crush even the strongest of people. Never settle, never give up, never say never.MR: Is there a teammate that took you under his wing when you arrived at Arkansas? Which teammate are you closest too? DU: Scott MacPherson has been the best mentor and role model I could have ever imagined. He showed me the ropes and taught me what it means to be a Razorback. He never ceases to give advice, and has been a great friend in my short year here at the U of A. MR: You were a member of Team USA for the World Championships in Berlin. Which athlete were you most excited about meeting? DU: To be a 1,500-meter runner and have the reigning 1500-meter World Champion on my team (Bernard Lagat) was a very exciting prospect for me. To meet Bernard and talk with him was a great experience. I really loved getting to know each and every athlete at the World Championships, veterans and rookies alike, as each athlete has something to offer in words of advice or just dinner conversation.MR: Which runner are you most excited to see on the start line next you? DU: I am excited to see a lot of athletes this year, but two specifically, Michael Chinchar and Duncan Phillips. They are great friends and training partners of mine who also run the mile for the U of A.They have very high aspirations, and the talent and work ethic to achieve them.They will be two of the best someday very soon and I will be there right next to him along the way.



Sports Category : Cross Country (M)